Tag Archives: Baby tooth

When is the Best Time for Your Childs First Dental Visit: How to Decide

How to Decide?

Answer the following questions:

  1. Do you brush or scrub your child’s teeth daily?
  2. Do you periodically monitor their teeth for cavities to make sure there’s no stains on their teeth?
  3. Are you diluting and taking them off juices and milk gradually?
  4. Do you not allow them to eat too much candies, chocolate, sweets, juices and sodas?
  5. Is this NOT your first child? “no” means it is your first.
  6. If you have other children, did they NOT develop any cavities until they were older?
  7. Is your child healthy with no diagnosed major medical problems?

If you answered “yes” to most of the above questions then you are probably fine waiting a bit longer to take your child in for their first visit. If you’re a first time mom you probably should take your child for an early wellness exam to make sure you’re not making any mistakes regarding their oral hygiene and dietary habits. But if you are an experienced mom, the ones who know when they need braces, when their adult teeth will come out, when they have to remove their wisdom teeth, etc. then you can probably wait until your child is a bit older before you take him or her to the dentist for their first visit provided they your not spoiling them and allowing them to consume too many sodas and sweets!

If you  answered “no” to most of the above questions then you probably should take your child in for a checkup when they are still very young to make sure there are no unpredictable problems or cavities hiding on you.

Final Thought

We think an early consultation is usually worth the effort especially if something is actually wrong. These first wellness visits are typically short and inexpensive and could be quite beneficial. And you just never know what a trained dentist can detect that might’ve gone unnoticed to you. He or she may find a cavity or an early developmental problem. They could advise you to correct their oral hygiene routine if they are building up too much plaque on their teeth. They may instruct you on improving their diet. They can review any oral hygiene products you are using for them. And if nothing else, having an early checkup visit and developing the good habit of going regularly to the dentist can slowly build your child’s ability to cope with going to the dentist.

helpful hint – If your child is scared and refuses to go to the dentist you may end up finding yourself rescheduling and postponing their first visit. How they behave at the doctors office may be a good indicator of how they’ll do at the dentist. So if this applies to you, we do not recommend postponing their visit but it may be wise to research your local dentists to find one that can handle more challenging children. You may want to consider taking them to a child friendly pediatric dentist over a regular dentist as they are probably better suited to manage them. Most general dentists refuse to treat uncooperative children and refer them out regularly so why put your child through a bad experience before doing so!

NEXT >> When is the Best Time for Your Childs First Dental Visit: At 6 Months to a Year

When is the Best Time for Your Childs First Dental Visit: At 2 to 3 Years

When is the Best Time for Your Childs First Dental Visit: At 2 to 3 Years

1. The dentist can take meaningful X-rays at 2 to 3 years of age to really visualize and examine your child’s teeth. If you bring your child for an exam when they are a few months old there is not much work your dentist can do for them. Most baby teeth haven’t came out yet and the mouth is too small to actually take any useful X-rays. The majority of the exam will be based on visual findings. And if you simply look carefully at their teeth you probably will be able to see any brown or black spots that may be resembling cavities yourself. It is not until they your child is a bit older at around two years or so when all the baby teeth have finally came out and the child is large enough to be able to take some useful X-rays. At this point your dentist can really see what is going on in their mouths and determine if there are cavities or any other problems.

2. Your child may now be old enough to perform some basic dental treatment if required. Again, there just isn’t a whole lot of dental treatment that can be done to a child less than a year old. Your child’s dental visit will resemble more of a consultation at this point. A cleaning and possibly some fluoride application provides minimal benefits. The majority of the visit at this age will consist of instructions on home hygiene and discussions regarding their diet and oral habits which you can research yourself if you have the patience. Very few children have any serious dental problems this early on if you are tending to their diet and oral hygiene.

  • Brush their teeth for them without using toothpaste just yet
  • Monitor their sugar intakes
  • Get them off the bottles which contain juices, milk or any type of sugar

3. Extra cost and effort. It can be overwhelming to fit in a dental cleaning during first year of your child’s life. In fact most moms feel that they are probably more deserving of a dental cleaning at this point and they are probably correct! With a full set of teeth and the risk of gum disease, you have a lot more to risk than your child does with only a handful of baby teeth barely out in their mouths!

NEXT >> When is the Best Time for Your Childs First Dental Visit: How to Decide

When is the Best Time for Your Childs First Dental Visit: At 6 Months to a Year

Saving vs. Removing Baby Teeth: How to Decide

How to Decide?

Answer the following questions:

  1. Has the tooth ever been painful?
  2. Is there a swelling around the tooth?
  3. Has your child been getting sick more often recently?
  4. If the bad tooth is in the front, is your child under the age of 5?
  5. If the bad tooth is in the back, is your child under the age of 10?
  6. Are you noticing adult teeth coming out but one baby tooth still oddly remaining in place?
  7. Has it been more than 6 months since your child last saw his or her dentist?

If you answered “yes” to most of the above questions then your should probably consider having a dentist take a look to see if the baby tooth requires removal. Don’t forget, only only can the infection from a bad bhttp://dentaldecider.com/saving-vs-removing-baby-teeth-removing-baby-teeth/aby tooth spread to the adult tooth sitting underneath it and cause it to rot and change color, but it can spread to the blood stream and affect your child’s entire well-being!

If you  answered “no” to most of the above questions then you might be able to wait see maybe the tooth falls out before it causes any real problems. But make sure to keep a close eye on the tooth in the meantime!

Final Thought

It is nicer if your child gets to keeps their baby teeth since these teeth play an important role in their development by preserving the spaces for the adult teeth to come out correctly in their proper position. Children who lose several baby teeth typically end up with lots of crowding issues with their adult teeth and many end up having crooked teeth and a poor bite as a result. Keeping their baby teeth will help your child chew easier, speak better and generally grow up with more confidence.

NEXT >> Saving vs. removing baby teeth: Saving baby teeth

Saving vs. removing baby teeth: Removing baby teeth